Portraits of Famous Americans

Sergt. G H Bates, The American Standard Bearer - 92 (All dark blue uniform)
Sergt. G H Bates, The American Standard Bearer - 92 (All dark blue uniform)

Sergeant Gilbert H. Bates of Wisconsin is the last candidate for pedestrian notoriety. He has made a bet that he will walk, alone, unarmed, without a cent in his pocket, and bearing aloft the American flag, through the late Southern Confederacy, from Vicksburg to Washington. He is already on his way, and the telegraph is noting his progress. The Mayor and a large portion of the population of Vicksburg ushered him out of that city with a grand demonstration. He proposes to sell photographs of himself at 25 cents apiece, all along his route, and convert the proceeds into a fund to be devoted to the aid and comfort of widows and orphans of soldiers who fought in the late war, irrespective of flag or politics. And then, I suppose, when he gets a good round sum together, for the widows and orphans, he will hang up his flag and go and have a champagne blow-out. I don't believe in people who collect money for benevolent purposes and don't charge for it. I don't have full confidence in people who walk a thousand miles for the benefit of widows and orphans and don't get a cent for it. I question the uprightness of people who peddle their own photographs, anyhow, whether they carry flags or not. In my opinion a man might as well start his name with an initial and spell his middle name out and hope to be virtuous.

MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS FROM WASHINGTON.
NUMBER VII.
WASHINGTON, January 30, 1868

Sergt. G H Bates, The American Standard Bearer - 92 framed from Godden Collection
Sergt. G H Bates, The American Standard Bearer - 92 framed from Godden Collection

Two tone blue uniform

Buffalo Bill (Col W F Cody) - 93
Buffalo Bill (Col W F Cody) - 93



Why did Stevens make a silk of Buffalo Bill?
Perhaps this article in the Coventry Evening Telegraph is the answer. Click picture to read the article.

The day Buffalo Bill came to Coventry


Mrs Cleveland - 96 rare version with poems on Backlabel
Mrs Cleveland - 96 rare version with poems on Backlabel

Frances Folsom Cleveland

She was born in Buffalo, New York, only child of Emma C. Harmon and Oscar Folsom--who became a law partner of Cleveland's. As a devoted family friend Cleveland bought "Frank" her first baby carriage. As administrator of the Folsom estate after his partner's death, though never her legal guardian, he guided her education with sound advice. When she entered Wells College, he asked Mrs. Folsom's permission to correspond with her, and he kept her room bright with flowers. Though Frank and her mother missed his inauguration in 1885, they visited him at the White House that spring. There affection turned into romance--despite 27 years' difference in age--and there the wedding took place on June 2, 1886.

Courtesy:-


Mrs Cleveland - 96 Woven at World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago 1893
Mrs Cleveland - 96 Woven at World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago 1893

Frances Folsom Cleveland

After the President's defeat in 1888, the Clevelands lived in New York City, where baby Ruth was born. With his unprecedented re-election, the First Lady returned to the White House as if she had been gone but a day. Through the political storms of this term she always kept her place in public favor. People took keen interest in the birth of Esther at the mansion in 1893, and of Marion in 1895. When the family left the White House, Mrs. Cleveland had become one of the most popular women ever to serve as hostess for the nation.

Courtesy:-


President Cleveland - 95 with Presidents, Generals & Wars Backlabel
President Cleveland - 95 with Presidents, Generals & Wars Backlabel

Grover Cleveland

The First Democrat elected after the Civil War, Grover Cleveland was the only President to leave the White House and return for a second term four years later.

One of nine children of a Presbyterian minister, Cleveland was born in New Jersey in 1837. He was raised in upstate New York. As a lawyer in Buffalo, he became notable for his single-minded concentration upon whatever task faced him.

At 44, he emerged into a political prominence that carried him to the White House in three years. Running as a reformer, he was elected Mayor of Buffalo in 1881, and later, Governor of New York.

Cleveland won the Presidency with the combined support of Democrats and reform Republicans, the "Mugwumps," who disliked the record of his opponent James G. Blaine of Maine.

Courtesy:-


President Cleveland - 95 Backlabel
President Cleveland - 95 Backlabel



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