Historical and Classical Subjects

Columbus Leaving Spain - 145 Woven at Worlds Columbian Exposition Chicago 1893
Columbus Leaving Spain - 145 Woven at Worlds Columbian Exposition Chicago 1893

Landing of Columbus, October 12th 1492 - Woven at Columbian Exhibition -146
Landing of Columbus, October 12th 1492 - Woven at Columbian Exhibition -146

John Vanderlyn
Oil on canvas, 12' x 18'
Commissioned 1836/1837; placed 1847 Rotunda
Christopher Columbus is shown landing in the West Indies, on an island that the natives called Guanahani and he named San Salvador, on October 12, 1492. He raises the royal banner to claim the land for his Spanish patrons, and he stands bareheaded, with his hat at his feet, in honor of the sacredness of the event. The captains of the Niņa and Pinta follow, carrying the banner of Ferdinand and Isabella. The crew displays a range of emotions, and some search for gold in the sand. Natives watch from behind a tree.

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Landing of Columbus, October 12th 1492 - Woven at Columbian Exhibition -146 framed
Landing of Columbus, October 12th 1492 - Woven at Columbian Exhibition -146 framed

Columbus Landung in Amerika i. J. 1492 - 146 German
Columbus Landung in Amerika i. J. 1492 - 146 German

Declaration of Independence July 4th 1776 - 147 remount - from Godden Collection
Declaration of Independence July 4th 1776 - 147 remount - from Godden Collection

Based on a painting of the same name by Daniel Maclise (1806-1870), currently in the Walker Museum in Liverpool.

Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 <BR> - 148 Woven in the York Exhibition 1879
Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 <BR> - 148 Woven in the York Exhibition 1879

Dick Turpin was born in 1706 in rural Essex, the son of John Turpin, a small farmer and some-time keeper of the Crown Inn. Some biographers say he was born in Thackstead, others name Hempstead. Young Dick probably served an apprenticeship with a butcher in Whitechapel- in those days, a village on the fringes of the capital. During his apprenticeship he "conducted himself in a loose and disorderly manner." When his apprenticeship was over, he opened a butcher shop, and began to steal sheep, lamb and cattle. Caught in the act of stealing two oxen, he fled into the depths of the Essex countryside to save himself. After resurfacing, he tried his hand at smuggling, but proved as inept at this venture as he had at cattle rustling. Before long customs agents compelled Turpin and his gang to lay low. Many people think of Dick Turpin as a lone highwayman, however for the majority of his criminal career he was a member of the Essex Gang (also known as the Gregory Gang). Members of Turpin's gang are known to have included: Thomas Barnfield, Mary Brazier, John Fielder, Jasper Gregory, Jeremy Gregory, Samual Gregory, Herbert Haines, John Jones, James Parkinson, Joseph Rose, Thomas Rowden, Ned Rust, William Saunders, Richard Turpin, Humphry Walker, and John Wheeler. There may have been other members who were either not identified or who were only occasional associates of the Gang.

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Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 - 148a - from Godden Collection
Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 - 148a - from Godden Collection

Woven at the York Exhibition 1879 - from Godden Collection

Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 - 148B with signpost
Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 - 148B with signpost

Woven in the York Exhibition 1879

Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess - 148C - no year - unrecorded
Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess - 148C - no year - unrecorded

Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 - 149
Dick Turpin's ride to York, on his bonnie Black Bess 1739 - 149

The Lady Godiva Procession - 150 story backlabel
The Lady Godiva Procession - 150 story backlabel

The story tells how Lady Godiva was upset with Leofric for crippling the development of Coventry with taxes.
She persistently pleaded with her husband, who eventually said he would reduce the taxes if she rode naked on a horse across the town.
Of course he never imagined she would complete the challenge.
Everyone showed their respect by staying indoors and with only her long hair to cover her, Lady Godiva rode through the deserted streets.
Only one person looked - the character we now know as Peeping Tom - but as he gave in to the temptation he was struck blind.
Amazed by her compassionate deed, Leofric fulfilled his promise and reduced the taxes immediately.

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Ye Lady Godiva - 151a not 'Ladye'
Ye Lady Godiva - 151a not 'Ladye'

The Death of Nelson - 152
The Death of Nelson - 152

British Vice Admiral Nelson of the Royal Navy, is shot on the quarter deck of his flag ship, H.M.S. VICTORY at the height of the Battle of Trafalgar. He later dies from the mortal bullet wound. Despite this loss, the French and Spanish Fleets are roundly defeated in this epic sea engagement of the Napoleonic Wars.

The Battle of Trafalgar, 1805

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Phoebus & Aurora - 153
Phoebus & Aurora - 153

Radetzky and King Victor Emanuel - 154
Radetzky and King Victor Emanuel - 154

Radetzky and King Victor Emanuel - Meeting after the Battle of Novara.

Wellington and Blucher - 155
Wellington and Blucher - 155

William of Orange - 156
William of Orange - 156

Mary II, born in 1662, was the daughter of James II and Anne Hyde. She was married to William of Orange as a matter of Charles II's foreign policy; she and William had no children. Mary died of smallpox in 1694. William III (William of Orange), born in 1650, was the son of William, Prince of Orange, and Mary Stuart (daughter of Charles I). Husband and wife were also first cousins, both being a grandchild of Charles I. William, one of the most significant players on the continent, constantly strove to spread Protestantism and decrease the Catholic influence of France and Spain. He died in 1702 from complications after being thrown from his horse.

The Battle of the Boyne

No date in Irish history is better known than 1690. No Irish battle is more famous than William III's victory over James II at the River Boyne, a few miles west of Drogheda.

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