Trains

The Mersey Tunnel Railway - 191
The Mersey Tunnel Railway - 191

Why was the Mersey Railway Tunnel built?
Opened in 1886 the Mersey Railway Tunnel was the first tunnel to be built below the River Mersey. It was designed to improve transport links between Liverpool and the developing town of Birkenhead and the Wirral peninsula across the River Mersey. Earlier suggestions to build a road tunnel and a bridge had both been unsuccessful and the first road tunnel beneath the Mersey was not opened until 1934.

Earlier proposals for a railway tunnel were also unsuccessful. An 1866 Act of Parliament authorised a pneumatic (air driven) railway beneath the River Mersey but this was not built owing to the limitations of the available technology. Before the Mersey Railway Tunnel was opened ferries were the only means of crossing the River Mersey between Liverpool and Birkenhead. Despite some difficulties the Mersey Railway Tunnel was a great success and remains in use to this day.

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The First Train - Built by Geo Stephenson in 1825 - 192 Stephenson credit
The First Train - Built by Geo Stephenson in 1825 - 192 Stephenson credit

George Stephenson (June 9, 1781 - August 12, 1848).
British engineer who designed a famous and historically important steam-powered locomotive named The Rocket.

George Stephenson was born in Wylam, England, several miles west of Newcastle upon Tyne. In 1748, a wagonway -- an arrangement similar to a railway, but with wooden tracks and designed to support horse-drawn carts -- had been built from the Wylam colliery to the River Tyne, running for several miles. The young Stephenson grew up near it, and in 1802 gained employment as an engine-man at a coal mine. For the next ten years his knowledge of steam engines increased, until in 1812 he stopped operating them for a living, and started building them.

Courtesy:-


The First Train - 192
The First Train - 192

KNOWN universally as the Father of the Railways,
George Stephenson (1781-1848) was the son of a Northumbrian colliery steam engine keeper. He began his working life alongside his father at Dewley Colliery but he was ambitious and took the first steps towards fame by learning to read and write at night school.

Courtesy:-


Stephenson's Triumph - Sixty Miles an Hour - 193 -1879 <BR> Woven in the York Exhibition 1879 (Type 1)
Stephenson's Triumph - Sixty Miles an Hour - 193 -1879 <BR> Woven in the York Exhibition 1879 (Type 1)

Top of left and right corner credits are about level with bottom of ".....From Stockton to Darlington"

To solve the problem they offered a premium of 500 for the best locomotive engine which should satisfy certain conditions. It was not to exceed 550 in price and six tons in weight; it was also to draw three times its own weight, at a speed of ten miles an hour on level ground. The famous Rainhill trial (October 8, 1829), when Stephenson's Rocket won the prize, sealed the fate of canals and inaugurated the triumph of railways.

Stephenson's Triumph - Sixty Miles an Hour - 193 Woven in the York Exhibition 1879 (Type 2)
Stephenson's Triumph - Sixty Miles an Hour - 193 Woven in the York Exhibition 1879 (Type 2)

The Present Time - 194
The Present Time - 194

The Present Time - 194 modern forgery framed
The Present Time - 194 modern forgery framed

The Present Time - 194a
The Present Time - 194a

The Present Time - 194a - No Title (Frame by J Brown)
The Present Time - 194a - No Title (Frame by J Brown)

An example of third party framing by an art dealer in London by the name of J Brown, 22 Duke Street, Aldgate, EC3. This was originally a poor quality matting job by a distributor who would buy silk strips from Stevens.

The Present Time - 194c remount framed yellow boiler unrecorded
The Present Time - 194c remount framed yellow boiler unrecorded

The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 195 + Envelope - from Godden Collection
The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 195 + Envelope - from Godden Collection

The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 196
The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 196

The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 196 (No Credit)
The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 196 (No Credit)

The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 196 (No Silk or Name Credit)
The Present Time - 60 Miles an Hour - 196 (No Silk or Name Credit)

Die jetzige Zeit - 196 framed German
Die jetzige Zeit - 196 framed German

The Present Time - 196 - Credit J J Mannion Cincinnati Ohio.
The Present Time - 196 - Credit J J Mannion Cincinnati Ohio.

The Present Time - 198 small Type 1 remount
The Present Time - 198 small Type 1 remount

The Present Time - 198 larger Type 2
The Present Time - 198 larger Type 2

The Present Time - 198a Driver leaning out
The Present Time - 198a Driver leaning out



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